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Stress Less® Meditation is good for your mental and physical health-Supporting Research
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(See our exclusive Stress Less® Meditation Program S4074 Tranquil Mediation). Meditation Research Support: -A group of over 200 high-risk individuals was asked to either take a health education class promoting better diet and exercise or take a class on Transcendental Meditation. During the next 5 years’s researchers accompanying the participants found that those who took the meditation class had a 48% reduction in their overall risk of heart attack, stroke and death. They noted that meditation “significantly reduced risk for mortality, myocardial infarction, and stroke in coronary heart disease patients. These changes were associated with lower blood pressure and psychosocial stress factors.” -Tibetan Buddhist monks are long time meditators and in a study comparing them to novice meditators, it was found that novice meditators “showed a slight increase in gamma activity, but most monks showed extremely large increases of a sort that has never been reported before in the neuroscience literature”. -John Hopkins University found that "mindfulness meditation" decreases levels of anxiety, depression, and pain. Harvard found that meditation literally changes the brain. The changes affected multiple parts of the brain, including the left hippocampus, which helps with learning and memory, and the amygdala, which manages anxiety, stress, and fear. They also found these brain changes can happen in just 8 weeks. -Harvard ran an experiment where 16 people were submitted to an eight-week "mindfulness" course, using guided meditations and integration of mindfulness into everyday activities. At the end of it, MRI scans show that the grey matter concentration increases in areas of the brain involved in learning and memory, regulating emotions, sense of self, and having perspective. -Emory University, Atlanta, demonstrated that participants with more meditation experience exhibit increased connectivity within the brain networks controlling attention. These neural relationships may be involved in the development of cognitive skills, such as maintaining attention and disengaging from distraction. Moreover, the benefits of the practice were observed also in normal state of consciousness during the day, which speaks to the transference of cognitive abilities “off the cushion” into daily life. The meditation practice examined was focusing the attention on the breath. -Harvard ran an experiment where 16 people were submitted to an eight-week "mindfulness" course, using guided meditations and integration of mindfulness into everyday activities. At the end of it, MRI scans show that the grey matter concentration increases in areas of the brain involved in learning and memory, regulating emotions, sense of self, and having perspective. Other studies also show a larger hippocampal and frontal volumes of grey matter for long-term meditators. -Research has shown that even after only four sessions of mindfulness meditation training, participants had significantly improved visuospatial processing, working memory, and executive functioning. -longer. A group of over 200 high-risk individuals was asked to either take a health education class promoting better diet and exercise or take a class on Transcendental Meditation. During the next 5 years researchers accompanying the participants found that those who took the meditation class had a 48% reduction in their overall risk of heart attack, stroke and death. They noted that meditation “significantly reduced risk for mortality, myocardial infarction, and stroke in coronary heart disease patients. These changes were associated with lower blood pressure and psychosocial stress factors.” -With only 20 minutes a day of meditation practice, students were able to improve their performance during cognitive skill tests, in some cases doing 10 X better than the non-meditators. They also performed better on information-processing tasks that were developed to induce deadline stress. In fact, there is evidence that meditators had thicker prefrontal cortex and right anterior insula, and showed promise that they might offset the loss of old age cognitive ability. -The University of Montreal exposed 13 Zen masters and 13 comparable non-practitioners to painful heat while measuring their brain activity in a fmri scanner (functional magnetic resonance imaging). The Zen meditators felt less pain and really had less pain than the fMRI indicated. -An hour of meditation can reduce the experience of pain and related brain activation. There was a 40% reduction in pain intensity and a 57% reduction in pain unpleasantness. It produced a greater reduction in pain than morphine or other pain-relieving drugs, which typically reduce pain ratings by about 25%. MBCT (Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy) was given to 50 Adult ADHD patients and resluts showed reduced impulsivity and increased “act-with-awareness” skills and reduced hyperactivity contributing to an overall increase in attention symptoms. -Mindfulness Meditation can increase rapid memory recall among other mental functions. -Long term meditation practice increases grey-matter density in the brain areas associated with memory,self awareness, learning,introspection, and compassion. -A study involving long time Buddist Monk meditators compared them to novice meditators. The findings revealed that "novice meditators “showed a slight increase in gamma activity. The vast majority of monks showed extremely large increases in gamma activity that was a first in neuroscience literature. -Meditation has recently been "re-discovered" by modern science as a subtle but powerful means of promoting healing in the body. This renewal of interest has come from the work of researchers exploring the effects of Transcendental Meditation (TM) and traditional Buddhist approaches to meditation. TM, which was introduced to the West by the Indian mystic Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, was the focus of research in the 1960s and 1970s by Herbert Benson, MD, and his colleagues at Harvard Medical School. In these studies, Dr. Benson discovered the "relaxation response," a physiological state now known to promote healing in the body. -Mindfulness and Transcendental Meditation are two major meditation approaches that are used in many complementary medicine programs for people with a wide range of health conditions, including cancer, HIV, chronic fatigue syndrome, heart disease, chronic pain and others. There are, of course, other varieties of meditation, but all approaches generally have a great deal in common.

Sources:Harvard,Science Direct,Time,University of Wisconsin,Wall Street Journal,Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine,University of California,NCBI,UCLA,Neurophysiology Journal,Frontiers Journal,PLOS Biology,American Heart Association,Emory University,OSher Research Center,Nottingham Trent University,New Scientist,


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